The Language of Love

Sarah Ritchie Your Ceremony


Many couples that I work with in New York come from families whose mother tongue is not English.

In most cases, family members are bi-lingual. However, from time-to-time, relatives speak no English at all. Out of respect for the unique cultural backgrounds, couples may choose to have parts of the wedding spoken in more than one language. For example, couples may decide to exchange vows in multiple languages, drawing family members into the ceremony in unique and loving ways. Another option is to have a poem or reading spoken in both languages. In cases where some guests speak no English, couples might consider providing a full translation of the text, given to guests prior to the ceremony. This allows them to follow the wedding proceedings with ease. And in one case, I have even partnered with a family member who translates the entire ceremony as it progresses, with a paragraph spoken in English followed be a repeat in the foreign language. This approach not only helps personalize the ceremony, but it engages all in attendance in a culturally relevant way.